Over the past few months, I have taken the tentative step to dip my toes into the realms of Photoshop having felt I had mastered to a certain point all that Lightroom could offer me in terms of developing an image.  I am constantly amazed at the wealth of knowledge out there. I feel there is still so much to be learnt. Photographers can produce incredible images with manipulation and digital enhancement. Turning a basic photograph into something amazing. An image that tells a story, or provokes you to question what is happening within that image. So...textures are my baby steps into the possibilities of enhancing an image. Textures are a layer. If you were to place a very fine piece of cloth over a photograph, you could still see the photograph underneath, but with the cloth draped across it would make it look different, this, in turn, would give a different feel when you looked at the image. This is basically how textures work by placing them across an image. Textures come in all colours. Some look like sheet metal, others like folded cloth, some are like concrete others like stained paper. There literally is something for everyone and every image.   Sometimes though, I don't find a texture works with the original image. It can distract or seem out of place. Yet, on other occasions, it can really make an image have depth and create that dialogue with the viewer of what they see as surreal or look like something out of an old suitcase of aged photographs, giving it a timeless quality. When you overlay the texture and using the tool layers within Photoshop, you as the creator can keep it strong or fade it so that it almost doesn't appear to have been placed at all. I like using textures on still life images or with my favourite playground of mother nature with flowers and fields and seed pod heads ( as shown above). My natural leaning is towards a stronger overlay, I think I am just drawn towards this, I like moody depths. The image above is from my Anemone plant that flowers beautifully in late summer into early Autumn. I leave the stems and heads to dry over the winter months and I watch with fascination as the seed pods burst open in strong winds to reveal soft tufts, almost like little cotton wool buds, waiting to be carried on the wind onto pastures new, flowering somewhere else. I chose this particular texture for its watercolour background and the colours seemed to compliment the mood of the plant and its background. Do you work with textures? Let me know how you get on if you do.

Over the past few months, I have taken the tentative step to dip my toes into the realms of Photoshop having felt I had mastered to a certain point all that Lightroom could offer me in terms of developing an image.  I am constantly amazed at the wealth of knowledge out there. I feel there is still so much to be learnt. Photographers can produce incredible images with manipulation and digital enhancement. Turning a basic photograph into something amazing. An image that tells a story, or provokes you to question what is happening within that image. So…textures are my baby steps into the possibilities of enhancing an image. Textures are a layer. If you were to place a very fine piece of cloth over a photograph, you could still see the photograph underneath, but with the cloth draped across it would make it look different, this, in turn, would give a different feel when you looked at the image. This is basically how textures work by placing them across an image. Textures come in all colours. Some look like sheet metal, others like folded cloth, some are like concrete others like stained paper. There literally is something for everyone and every image.   Sometimes though, I don’t find a texture works with the original image. It can distract or seem out of place. Yet, on other occasions, it can really make an image have depth and create that dialogue with the viewer of what they see as surreal or look like something out of an old suitcase of aged photographs, giving it a timeless quality. When you overlay the texture and using the tool layers within Photoshop, you as the creator can keep it strong or fade it so that it almost doesn’t appear to have been placed at all. I like using textures on still life images or with my favourite playground of mother nature with flowers and fields and seed pod heads ( as shown above). My natural leaning is towards a stronger overlay, I think I am just drawn towards this, I like moody depths. The image above is from my Anemone plant that flowers beautifully in late summer into early Autumn. I leave the stems and heads to dry over the winter months and I watch with fascination as the seed pods burst open in strong winds to reveal soft tufts, almost like little cotton wool buds, waiting to be carried on the wind onto pastures new, flowering somewhere else. I chose this particular texture for its watercolour background and the colours seemed to compliment the mood of the plant and its background. Do you work with textures? Let me know how you get on if you do.